Why did you make modelling your choice of career? I didn’t choose to be a model it’s just a natural thing to me. My dad used to tease me when I was young that I would be a model or do something in the entertainment world. Actually, I went to France to study Psychology and that is what I ever wanted to do but fashion has always been a part of me and a hobby which I am very passionate about.

There is no better place to explore the world of fashion than France. I attended quite a number of fashion shows in order to learn more and somehow I went for a photo shoot which was more like an open call in south of France. It was there that I met a lady who was scouting for a model-ling agency, and she was like I should re-ally chase a career in modelling.

She taught me how to go about it and directed me to a few places in Paris. I later decided to get into the London School of Beauty and Aesthetic where I was trained to be a beauty consultant and specialist.

How many times have you been on the runway?

I have done the runway like twice but that is not my own kind of modelling. I am more of an editorial model. We have different types of modelling such as: runway, commercial, editorial, luxury, swimsuit among others but what always comes to people’s mind is runway model. Modelling is so broad and that is why people have to be educated because if you say I want to be a model, then what kind of a model? Is it plus size, video model or what?

What is editorial modelling all about?

It is more like a picture kind of model-ling where you appear in commercial ad-verts, magazines and the likes.

What was growing up like?

My mum is Hungarian and my dad a Nigerian from Delta State. We are Delta Igbo.  I was brought up in Nigeria and I have five siblings. All left to study in dif-ferent countries though we all had our secondary education in Nigeria.

In spite of his recognising the traits of modelling in you as a kid, your fa-ther still sent you to read Psychology. How does he feel now that you have switched to modelling?

My dad is a very open minded per-son. If you are happy, he is happy. And why should he stop you from doing what makes you happy; so far you are not hurt-ing yourself or anyone? We were brought up in a way to chase our dreams though we all have this Nigerian upbringing where you have to be a doctor or lawyer. At the end of the day, it’s all about what makes you happy and where your pas-sion leads you.

Whom did you take after: your mum or dad?

Both, but people say I look like my mum. I also take bits of her character. My mum is a nurse in Warri.  Almost everybody knows my mum in Delta State. She has been taking care of al-most everybody since they were kids. She is very ambitions, smart, bold and blunt. She will never take no for answer and that is me also. My dad is cool, calm and calculated. He is very practical in nature.

How long has your mum been in Nigeria?

She has been in Nigeria for more than 30 years.

When was your first big job?

It was in 2005. That was when I did edi-torial and commercial pictures for a pho-tography and modelling agency.

When are you bringing your trade-mark to Nigeria?

I am currently focusing on my shoe brand that will be launched soon. That has been on for a while but I put it on hold because of other things in my life. I belong to the school of thought that says anything worth doing at all is worth do-ing well. I am a perfectionist; my shoe brand would be in Nigeria by the end of this year

Have you now dumped Psychology for modelling?

Not really, if I get an offer, I will do the job. But my goal for now is to launch my fashion brand.

How did you meet your age long lov-er, Ikechukwu?

(Laughs) It’s complicated. We were sup-posed to do a job together in 2006/2007. I was to work with him on a project. But it never happened. We got to meet after that and we became friends before we started dating. We always hang out in London and New York.

How did you feel when he proposed?

I was just laughing. It was on my birthday and he was trying to be sneaky all through that week but I had already known what was happening, I just didn’t know the moment. He tried his best to keep distracting me by taking me to two different dinners before we finally got to the dinner that had my family in atten-dance. The proposal, engagement and the ring were significant because to us, we are as good as married.

What strikes you most about him the first time you met?

(Pauses) He’s a liberal like me, so we have a lot in common. He’s very ambitious and there is nothing more attractive about a man than the fact that he’s hardwork-ing and ambitious. I like everything about him.

What has been your most memora-ble moment?

That was when I helped my sister to de-liver her child. I was in the delivery room, cut the umbilical cord and I was so happy. You can never get anything bigger than watching another life being given birth to. It’s something I cannot explain, I am so grateful that she shared that moment with me.

What is the craziest rumour you have read about yourself?

I have read quite a number of malicious stories but I cannot forget the rumour that I was dating my fiancé’s (Ikechukwu’s) best friend. That was crazy.

How do you feel about some of your salacious pictures that have found their ways online?

(Laughs) I don’t feel bad; do I not look good in those pictures?

You don’t mind going nude in pic-tures?

I have never done nude pictures and I would not go topless for photo shoot.  I was well covered up in those pictures that are generating buzzes online and they are just sexy pictures.

Is your fiancé not complaining about these pictures?

No, as long as I don’t show my boobs and those pictures were taken in respect-able manners

Do you have any plans of acting in movies or singing in future?

Actually, Ikechukwu keeps trying to get me to sing in the studio. I am still negotiat-ing acting and you might see me in a new soap opera.

How many kids do you intend hav-ing?

(Laughs) I am good with two but if God gives me more, I will take.